Women United Period

  • Half the world's population enters a monthly cycle but not all cycles are created equal.


    Women United Period

    Banana leaves, grass, newspaper , mud, mattress filling, or old rags are things that some girls and women around the world use to manage their flow because they do not have access to sanitary pads. Fifty days out of the year girls and women are not showing up for school or work which hurts the family, community, and economy. We want to break this vicious cycle, together we can create a new cycle if we supply the resources to make one, give one, and save one. Sewing machines will give women the ability to manufacture Eco-friendly pads, supply their communities, and access the pads themselves. When do we start? Today with Women United Period.

Break the Cycle:
Make Eco-friendly Pads to Keep Girls in School
Vicious Cycle:
Take the Shame out of being a girl. Think about it, half the world’s population enters a monthly cycle but not all cycles are created equal. Banana leaves, grass, newspaper, mattress filling, corn husks, old rags, mud, tree bark are just some of the things that girls and women use around the world to manage their flow simply because they do not have access to sanitary pads. Worse, girls are often exploited in exchange for hygiene. Imagine, fifty days out of the year girls and women are not showing up for school or work and this hurts the family, community, and the economy. 50 days =1200 hrs 50 days each year = 5 years over a life time that a young girls is absent from school or a woman does not work because of her menstrual cycle.




Break the Cycle:
Make one, Give one, and Save one. We want to break this viscous cycle; together we can create a new cycle if we supply the resources to make one, give one, and save one. If we supply girls with sewing machines, they can manufacture Eco-friendly pads and supply their communities by selling pads for a reduced amount thereby supplying a solution to the menstrual inconveniences and create a source of income. In addition, girls access the very pads that they manufacture. Think about it, if all a young girl knows how to do is stay home when her cycle comes she will grow up to be a woman who does the same. But we can break that cycle if we unite—period. When should we start? Today, of course, with WOMEN UNITED PERIOD.
Take the shame out of being a girl In any developing world…
Girls who get an education are 40% more likely to have kids who live to age 5.
Girls who get an education are three times less likely to contract HIV/AIDS.
Girls who get an education are more likely to seek healthcare for their children and for themselves.
An extra year of primary school boosts girls’ eventual wages by 10 to 20 percent.
An extra year of secondary school: 15 to 25 percent.
When a girl in the developing world receives seven or more years of education, she marries four years later and has 2.2 fewer children.
When women and girls earn income, they reinvest 90 percent of it into their families, as compared to only 30 to 40 percent for a man.
Without resources to catch up in school, girls get further and further behind in classes, fail, get discouraged and drop out of school.

$5 buys quarterly sanitary pads for one girl. Get a WUP engraved Pen
$25 buys sanitary pads for one year ensuring that a girl stays in school. Get a handmade bookmaker by a girl
$50 buys educational supplies to educate 500 girls about menstrual hygiene. Get a handmade Key Chain by a girl
$150 buys a sowing machine with initial supplies to manufacture Eco-friendly pads.
Get a WUP T-shirt. $250 gives a girl the chance to go to school for one year. Get an original batik painting by a widow.
$500 gives five families in a community sowing machines to create sustainable income.
Get a widow crafted handmade leather tripod stool a favorite for African enthusiasts.

Our Story from Founder As a young girl growing up in America, I remember the first day I got my period. Although I had been prepared mentally during sex education courses in my sixth grade, nothing prepared me emotionally when that day actually came. I remember so vividly the confusion and embarrassment I felt because I still had no idea what was happening; however, two days into my period, I mustered up the courage to speak to an adult who explained what was happening while giving me the supplies I needed to get through the rest of the day. I received things like damp cloths to clean up, a fresh pair of under wear, and a maxi pad. I had challenges keeping track of my cycle but at least I had my supplies. Unfortunately, this was not the case with young girls I found in the jungles of Africa. When their menses occur, it is a bigger ordeal than the one I experienced. During my most recent trip to Uganda my heart broke into a million pieces when I found a young girl using leaves and she shared how most of her peers resort to getting pregnant to eliminate the inconvenience of their menses. Women United Period is a program of Tender Mercies Foundation a registered 501c3 providing social services to impoverished families and children all over the world. No girl should feel ashamed because of her special time of the month. Support us as we take the shame out of being a girl. Regina D. Nsubuga Founder Tender Mercies Foundation